Tag: 上海水磨是不是都关门了

Green Ideas Making Concrete from Rice

first_img(PhysOrg.com) — Concrete accounts for about 5% of all human-related CO2 emissions. The fact that we use so much cement in building could mean that the issue becomes even more pronounced in the future. But what if there was a way to make concrete that was more environmentally friendly? A team of researchers in Texas things there might be — by adding rice to concrete. Image source: Botanical.com Citation: Green Ideas: Making Concrete from Rice (2009, July 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-07-green-ideas-concrete-rice.html Explore further New homes rise from rubbish One of the ingredients that can be used in cement is ash. By mixing rice husk ash into the cement, there is the possibility of greener concrete. Discovery News offers this on the process of creating carbon neutral rice ash:Now, Rajan Vempati of ChK Group, Inc. in Plano, Texas, and a team of researchers have figured out a way to make nearly carbon-free rice husk ash. Heating husks to 800 degrees centigrade (1,472 degrees Fahrenheit) in a furnace drives off carbon, leaving fine particles of nearly pure silica behind.”The process emits some CO2, but it’s carbon neutral. Any that we emit goes back annually into the rice paddies,” Vempati said.Concrete is a favorite repository of unwanted waste materials, from steel slag to silica fume, since it can provide a useful way of recycling products that are hard to get rid of without filling landfills. Ash from rice husks, while not completely neutralizing the pollution that comes from making cement, could reduce it. On top of that, this ash provides protection against corrosion and strengthens the concrete.The process has yet to be refined and tested in real-world conditions, so the idea is still mostly in its initial stages. However, when one considers that up and coming economic powers, such as India and (especially) China, will be likely ramping up production of concrete for use in buildings and roads, the prospect of reducing carbon emissions and pollution through the use of risk husk ash in concrete becomes even more interesting.© 2009 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Meet the Hover Camera Passport Your Personal Selfie Drone

first_img Selfie drones are a thing. We’ve seen a few models with the sole purpose of following you around, taking video and snapping pictures of you when you’re adventuring or doing something as banal as grocery shopping.The Hover Camera Passport, on display at CES, is another of these small, portable aircraft. It has some design advantages when compared with others we’ve reviewed, including the Dobby, in that its rotors are protected by a plastic cage. This prevents them from getting damaged in flight, and prevents you from inadvertent injury.It sports a camera that can capture stills at 13-megapixel quality and video at 4K resolution. And, because of it small, lightweight design, no FAA registration is required. The Passport is controlled via a smartphone app (Android and iOS are supported), and can track your movements based on the location of your phone, or track a subject using facial recognition.The folding design is a big plus for folks who want to own a drone, but not a serious high flyer like the DJI Phantom 4. It can fly at speeds up to 17mph (about a third of what the Phantom is capable of), but while you can take a big drone and fly it up to a mile away from home base, Hover Camera recommends that you keep the Passport within 65 feet (20 meters) of your phone. A short battery life is a big reason for that — you can expect it to hover in place for just 10 minutes on a fully charged battery.It’s on sale now, but you may balk at the $599 price, which is a lot to ask for a personal selfie drone. You can get a very capable DJI Phantom 3 Standard for less, after all. But if you love capturing your own image, and want to put an aerial spin on your selfies, the Passport looks like a promising option for narcissists with deep pockets. This story originally appeared on PCMag Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now January 5, 2017 Enroll Now for Free 2 min read This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience.last_img read more