Author: admin

6 Ways The HTC Vive Will Freak Out Virtual-Reality Geeks

first_imgThe Key to Mass Adoption of Wearables You Think Your Employees WANT to Wear That Devi… How Wearables Will Take Health Monitoring to th… Related Posts This year’s Mobile World Congress should have been renamed Mobile Wearable Congress, with many of the world’s tech companies showing off their latest strappy gadgets. One of the big winners in this category is HTC and the gigantic piece of face gear it introduced this week.Though expected to whip out its first smartwatch, the company instead unveiled its HTC Vive virtual reality goggles. Powered by SteamVR, a technology from partner and gaming heavyweight Valve, it’s part of a whole system that wraps the user in a digitally created world. Think Samsung Gear VR and Oculus Rift, but with a bigger hardware system. And better—way better. I toured Vive’s artificial worlds, and they looked and felt much realer than I anticipated. It’s the difference between being passively “immersed” in a fake setting, and feeling like you’re actually in an alternate universe that you can explore and interact with. Best of all, after half an hour, no nausea. Not bad for someone with a slight astigmatism and a habit of getting motion sick. Building A Better RealityI’ve tried two of the leading names in VR technology before—the Oculus Rift and the Samsung Gear VR—and they each have their merits. The Rift was the first device to excite modern app and game developers about virtual reality, after years of laughable attempts. The Gear VR lets users experience a manufactured world without cables by popping a Samsung smartphone in the self-contained unit. At this point, Sony, Microsoft, Epson and others are crowding into the face gear realm, whether for virtual reality or its cousin, augmented reality, which adds an overlay to the physical world. Rumor has it, Apple may even get into this game. Most will have a tough time meeting the bar HTC just set. The Taiwanese company is known for making pretty, well-built phones that somehow fail to light up the market. But with the Vive, which won MWC’s Best In Show category, how it looks—or what you look like wearing it—isn’t the point. (Good thing, too, because how it looks is pretty dreadful.)What the technology lets you see and do is what matters, and it turns out, it’s a lot.When VR is good, you don’t just watch the world around you. You feel like you’re part of that world. When it’s really, really good, you get to interact with it too. I instinctively ducked when the artfully created and realistic digital whales and fish came toward my head. I made tomato soup, screwed up a robot in a futuristic repair lab, and 3D-painted in bold, bright, colorful strokes in mid-air. A few more details: You can actually move aroundWith the Gear VR, you’re a fixed point in space. You can look around and turn your head left or right, but you can’t walk and explore. Oculus Rift manages to offer some “spatial positioning” or tracking through a laptop camera or the like, but it’s limited. The Vive goggles, encrusted with shiny compact little hardware components, work with room-situated laser sensors that can detect your physical location. You fix the room parameters or size, and the system sets its virtual boundaries. You can interact with virtual objectsVive works with two joysticks that feature touchpads and trigger-style buttons. The units let users manipulate objects—for instance, by picking up virtual items or batting away obstructions.I used clunky wired joysticks, but the company told me they were working on wireless versions. That’s a relief, because I almost tripped on those wires a few times. The cables extending from the goggles itself—attached at the top where the HDMI port, USB ports and headphone jack sit—look ridiculous, but ultimately didn’t get in my way. The smartphone-based Gear VR wasn’t built for full-fledged interactions. It works with a game controller-style directional pad. The Rift can make it work to some degree with third-party add-ons. One of the most intriguing might be the motion-control Myo Band, which looks like a punk rock arm band, but can interpret electrical signals from your muscles as gestures or movement. Made by Thalmic Labs, the $200 device hasn’t reached a broad enough audience to spark wide support yet.HTC’s controllers are a fundamental part of the system, and developers will be able to support them when they build Vive apps and games. Better visuals are baked inThe goggles feature two 1,200 x 1,080 displays, one for each eye, that deliver the sprawling 360-degree scenes. The graphics pipe in at 90 frames per second, which is high for this type of VR technology. In the demo, I saw no head-splitting blurriness, no sudden or jarring panning action, no sputters and, most importantly, no queasiness. When I moved around, the scene moved with me smoothly and naturally. Usually, I can only stomach virtual reality in small doses. This time, half an hour felt too short. I didn’t want to leave this world. HTC Vive fits over eyeglassesThe cushioned inner molding and large size gives the goggles a roomier feel that was actually large enough to accommodate my eyeglasses, without pushing them uncomfortably into my face. Even the sounds are realisticWith attached headphones, Vive offers hi-fidelity sound that can distinguish between noises that are supposed to come from behind you or move horizontally in front of you. In other words, flat, uni-directional sound won’t take you out of this world. It’s not clear whether it can compete with the “spatial audio” of Oculus Rift’s new Crescent Bay prototype or Sony’s “3D positional audio” in its latest PlayStation VR project, Project Morpheus. But Vive’s sound travels the way you’d expect real life noises to move, both for foreground and ambient audio. You’ll be able to do more than gamingTo produce the Vive, HTC joined forces with gaming giant Valve and its 125 million-subscriber online gaming platform, Steam. But that doesn’t mean the system will be a gaming-only proposition. The company struck deals with HBO, Lionsgate and Google for entertainment and VR-oriented media. The move appears to take direct aim at Samsung, its rival in the smartphone business and now virtual reality market. The South Korean tech giant, which launched its own goggles last year, has been promoting its Milk VR video service for a couple of months now. Samsung’s unspectacular update to its Gear VRSee also: Samsung Is Getting Serious About Producing Its Own Virtual-Reality VideosWhen it comes to VR hardware, Samsung seems to be asleep at the wheel. While HTC showed off its amazing new Vive and Oculus readies its first consumer release, Samsung gave its Gear VR the measliest of updates. There’s almost no difference between the new model and the old one, except support for the latest Galaxy phones—the glassy S6 and the dual-curved S6 Edge. In other words, if you’re a Gear VR user and want one of the new Galaxy phones, you’ll have to replace your virtual reality goggles too. Perhaps instead, fans will wait for HTC’s new gadget. The Vive will hit the market by the end of the year. In the meantime, developers will be able to get their hands on it some time this spring. Photos by Adriana Lee for ReadWritecenter_img Tags:#Gear VR#HTC#HTC Vive#Oculus Rift#Oculus VR#virtual reality#virtual reality headset#VR adriana lee 4 Ways Big Data & VR Are Changing Professi…last_img read more

Jaunt’s Virtual Reality Cinema Takes VR Beyond Gaming

first_img4 Ways Big Data & VR Are Changing Professi… Related Posts signe brewster You Think Your Employees WANT to Wear That Devi… Jaunt’s virtual reality cameraIn the year since cinematic virtual reality startup Jaunt launched, the world of VR has once again turned upside down. There are new headsets, new industries interested and, finally, definite plans to release it to consumers. The race is on to determine which content will define the world’s first experiences with the medium.Jaunt CEO Jens Christenson can’t help but get excited about all the activity and identify one of its greatest opportunities: I think technology has gotten to the point [where] people are excited about it. They’re going to get the headsets, especially mobile headsets. The biggest overarching thing is just creating enough content so we can have what I call critical mass of content in 2015. So when people get their headsets, there is great content they can view, but also fresh content coming every day, every week, so they keep coming back.At the South By Southwest festival, Christensen had a fresh reel of content to show me, including aerial shots of rock climbers and an on-stage view of a Paul McCartney concert. Jaunt’s custom camera captures 360 degrees of 3D video that pulls on the emotional strings that make virtual reality feel so real. VR Films Are No Laughing MatterJaunt’s founders take a moment to yuck it up for the cameras.It’s clear that Jaunt is beginning to experiment with new forms of video. Back when the company was still in stealth mode, its clips felt mostly like home movies—simple shots of a children’s choir, BMX bikers and a tranquil yard. There was one experimental scene from a horror film.Today, the production value feels much higher. In one scene from “Other Space,” the upcoming Yahoo comedy by the creator of “Freaks and Geeks,” characters lobbed mildly humorous insults and got in my face while examining me aboard their spaceship. See also: 6 Ways The HTC Vive Will Freak Out Virtual-Reality GeeksThis was the first comedy I’ve seen in virtual reality. While I don’t have great things to say about the script writing, it raised some interesting thoughts. Oculus Rift, one of several headsets that Jaunt films will support.You know how people like to keep a little distance between themselves and other people or objects? Your desire for personal space in real life still exists in VR. But the scene didn’t ask me to laugh at some character on the screen getting poked and prodded—it asked me to laugh at myself. It was a conflicting feeling of discomfort and amusement. Another clip, “Stress Level Zero,” is Jaunt’s first piece to feature computer-generated material. An animated alien in a spacesuit lands and begins performing a DJ set, while live-action FBI agents shout at it to freeze. The combination felt natural in VR. Virtual Opportunity—And CompetitionJaunt plans to remain goggle agnostic, but its biggest boost may come from mobile headsets, which eliminates wires by using a phone as their screen. “We’re very excited about the mobile solution,” Christensen said. “The thing that’s so great about mobile for us is, it plays video really well. It’s really not that suited for video games.”Jaunt CTO Arthur van Hoff, vice president of engineering Tom Annau and CEO Jens Christensen.That means less competition for eyeballs on the platform that could be the first VR experience for millions of people. Films run just fine on headsets like Oculus Rift and Sony’s Project Morpheus, which have higher-quality screens, but they were born for gaming and need to be tethered to a computer. Samsung and Oculus’ Gear VR headset is made to be out in the world getting strapped onto as many heads as possible. Christensen said he is even excited about Cardboard, Google’s inexpensive headset that is literally made out of cardboard. I agree with Christensen that it’s all about content now. Even today, you can have a great experience in VR whether you’re using Gear or HTC’s new Vive, which was the hit of the 2015 Game Developers Conference. Jaunt is under similar pressure. While it has the intellectual property rights to protect its camera, plus its editing and distribution software and apps, it is no longer the only company creating high-quality videos for VR. See also: Samsung Is Getting Serious About Producing Its Own Virtual-Reality VideosBut Jaunt’s latest demos convinced me that its inventiveness could still give it the edge. The company provides evolving creation tools to artists and developers, and it’s clearly thinking hard about what VR cinema should feel like. Christensen’s team is also considering how to make watching VR videos more social, to beat back the feelings of isolation common in virtual reality environments. The questions that remain for cinematic VR creators will take years to answer. But hopefully, when the first headsets emerge later this year, the industry will have a compelling start.Camera photo and color shot of founders by Signe Brewster for ReadWrite; all others courtesy of Jauntcenter_img The Key to Mass Adoption of Wearables How Wearables Will Take Health Monitoring to th… Tags:#Jaunt#SXSW#SXSW 2015#virtual reality#VR last_img read more

California ~ Corporate, Personal Income Taxes: FTB to Follow Federal Procedures for Certain Accounting Method Changes

first_imgCCH Tax Day ReportThe California Franchise Tax Board (FTB) announced that it is withdrawing FTB Notice 96-3, which declared that the FTB would not follow the federal procedures for a change of accounting method involving previously unclaimed but allowable depreciation or amortization deductions provided by IRS Revenue Procedure 96-31 (1996-1 C.B. 714). The procedures provided by Revenue Procedure 96-31 have been periodically updated by the IRS in subsequent iterations. The latest iteration is embodied in Revenue Procedure 2016-29. Accordingly, the FTB is following the provisions of Revenue Procedure 2016-29. Furthermore, since the FTB does not provide automatic consent, an accounting method change under Revenue Procedure 2016-29 or any of its other iterations may only be made (1) if the taxpayer has a deemed California election, or (2) with the prior consent of the FTB.FTB Notice 2017-03, California Franchise Tax Board, April 27, 2017, ¶406-674last_img read more

Kentucky Proposes Market-Based Sourcing Rules

first_imgKentucky proposed regulatory changes for market-based sourcing and using a a single receipts factor corporate income tax apportionment formula.The regulation would incorporate new provisions in 2018 legislation.Market-Based Sourcing RulesReceipts from sales other than sales of tangible personal property are in Kentucky, if the taxpayer’s market for the sales is in the state. The proposed regulation establishes uniform rules for:determining whether the market for a sale is in Kentucky; andreasonably approximating the state or states of assignment if the location of the taxpayer’s market cannot be determined.Several of the assignment rules apply in sequential order. Taxpayers must also:determine the method of assignment in good faith and with reasonable effort;keep contemporaneous records that explain the determination; andexercise state-to-state and year-to-year consistency in the inclusion or exclusion of receipts.Sourcing for ServicesIn general, taxpayers must assign receipts from services to Kentucky if the services were delivered to a location in the state. The term “delivered to a location” refers to the location of the taxpayer’s market for the service. This may not be the location of the taxpayer’s employees or property.In-Person ServicesTaxpayers must assign receipts from in person services to Kentucky if the customer receives the service in the state. This includes services performed in Kentucky that relate to:the customer’s body, like hair cutting or X-ray services;the customer’s physical presence, like live entertainment or athletic performances;the customer’s real estate;the customer’s tangible personal property at the customer’s residence or in the customer’s possession; andthe customer’s tangible personal property that is shipped or delivered to the customer.Professional ServicesA taxpayer that delivers a professional service to an individual customer must assign the receipts to Kentucky if:the customer’s primary residence is in the state; orthe customer’s billing address is in the state.A taxpayer that delivers a professional service to a business customer must assign the receipts to Kentucky if:the contract of sale is principally managed by the customer in the state;the customer placed the order for the service in the state; orthe customer’s billing address is in the state.Taxpayers can also use a safe harbor rule for large volume transactions. A taxpayer can assign its receipts from services based on a particular customer’s billing address if the taxpayer:does not derive more than 5% of all its service receipts from that customer; andengages in substantially similar service transactions with more than 250 customers.Special rules apply to:taxpayers that derive more than 5% of all service receipts from a customer;services delivered physically or electronically for or through a customer;architectural and engineering services;financial services;broadcast advertising services; andservices sold to related members that own or control the taxpayer.Intangible PropertyTaxpayers must assign receipts to Kentucky from the license or sale of intangible property used in the state. The assignment depends on the type of license or nature of the property sold. This includes distinct sourcing rules for:marketing intangibles;production intangibles;broadcasting intangibles;mixed intangibles;contract rights or government licenses that authorize use in a specific geographic area;software transactions;digital goods or services; andtransactions that resemble the sale of goods or services.Throwout RulesReceipts from other than tangible personal property must be thrown out of the receipts factor if:the taxpayer is not taxable in the state where it assigns the receipts; orthe state of assignment cannot be determined or reasonably approximated.Industry Specific Sourcing RulesThe regulation sets forth receipts factor sourcing rules for various industries. This includes rules for:bargelines;buslines;passenger airlines;pipelines;public service companies;air freight forwarders;railroads;regulated investment companies (RICs);securities brokerage services; andtrucklines.Public Hearing and Comment PeriodKentucky will hold a public hearing for the proposed regulation on December 21, 2018. It will accept written comments through December 31, 2018.103 KAR 16:270, Kentucky Department of Revenue, filed November 14, 2018Login to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

Massachusetts Releases Draft Guidance on International TCJA Provisions

first_imgMassachusetts released draft guidance on its treatment of selected international provisions in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA). The guidance applies to:– corporate excise taxpayers; and– personal income taxpayers.It explains how taxpayers should treat and report:– IRC Sec. 965 repatriation income;– IRC Sec. 951A global intangible low-taxed income (GILTI);– the IRC Sec. 245A participation exemption deduction for foreign-source dividends; and– the IRC Sec. 250 deduction from foreign-derived intangible income (FDII) and GILTI.Repatriation IncomeIRC Sec 965 requires a one-time inclusion of certain untaxed foreign earnings and profits in a taxpayer’s Subpart F income. It also allows a deduction for part of the earnings that reduces the tax rate on this income.A taxpayer can elect to pay tax on the income in installments over 8 years. An S corporation shareholder can elect to defer the tax liability until the tax year in which a triggering event occurs.GILTIIRC Sec. 951A requires U.S. shareholders of any controlled foreign corporation to include its share of the CFC’s GILTI in gross income. The GILTI inclusion applies to tax years beginning after 2017.FDII and GILTI DeductionIRC Sec. 250 allows a corporation with GILTI and FDII to deduct part of that income on its federal return. The deduction reduces the rate of U.S. tax on GILTI and FDII.Participation Exemption DeductionThe TCJA established a participation exemption system for the taxation of foreign income. It replaces a system that taxed earnings from a foreign corporation only after it distributed the income to US shareholders. IRC Sec 245A provides a 100% deduction for dividends received from certain foreign corporations.Massachusetts TreatmentTaxpayers computing Massachusetts excise or income tax liability must include:– IRC Sec 965 repatriation income; and– IRC Sec. 951A GILTI.Massachusetts does not allow the:– IRC Sec 965 deduction for excise or income taxpayers;– IRC Sec. 250 FDII or GILTI deduction for excise taxpayers; or– IRC Sec. 245A participation exemption deduction for excise taxpayers.Massachusetts treats the repatriation income and GILTI as dividend income. So, excise taxpayers can claim a dividends received deduction for 95% of that income if they meet stock ownership requirements.A corporation must exclude repatriation income or GILTI from the sales factor of its apportionment formula. A financial institution must also exclude this income from the receipts factor of its apportionment formula. The apportionment guidance on repatriation income for financial institutions represents a change in previous guidance. This resulted from changes later enacted by supplemental budget legislation (TAXDAY, 2018/10/26, S.8).Massachusetts taxpayers cannot elect to pay tax liability on repatriation income in installments. An S corporation shareholder also cannot defer Massachusetts tax liability on that income.Working Draft TIR 19-XX: Massachusetts Implications of Selected International Provisions of the Federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, Massachusetts Department of Revenue, January 16, 2019Login to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

The Creatives: Meet Singer/Songwriter Aaron Camper (Video)

first_img Aaron Camper’s early memories of the Philly music scene came from being an eager, talented 18 year-old roaming the halls of Larry Gold’s “The Studio,” — now Milk Boy The Studio — when the collective energy of artists like The Roots, Bilal, Musiq Soulchild and Jill Scott were just beginning to bubble over into mainstream music. Camper recalls seeing all of these artists pushing the limits of soul and R&B music, as well as their own sounds to the next level. Turns out, Camper was right at home amongst these musical giants.  Since those days, Camper has gone on to tour the world alongside of many of music’s biggest stars, including Chris Brown, Jill Scott and Justin Timberlake. Now, the world is about to find out that the voice behind these powerhouse artists is a star in the making as well. Not only is Camper a talented vocalist and performer,  but he’s also creative and sought-after songwriter. He’s composed songs with artists like Dirty Money and Jason Nelson, and even pens many of his own records. In 2011, Camper made a bold step and dropped his mixtape Welcome to My World with friend and business partner, highly-acclaimed musical director, Adam Blackstone. The mixtape was released under Blackstone’s label, BASSic Black Entertainment (BBE) and garnered its own buzz as Camper traveled performing shows between his background gigs with major headliners. The project showcased his songwriting and eclectic musical taste which ranges from The Winans to Phil Collins. If you’ve seen Aaron live then you know that something special happens when he steps on stage, whether he’s the forefront or holding it down on background. His voice is full of emotion and his live set is fun and always tells a story. He takes you back to your 90s hip-hop favorites and transitions seamlessly into his songs like “Breaking My Heart” and “Madness.” Philly 360° caught up with Camper while on break from touring with Justin Timberlake’s 20/20 Experience World Music Tour. We followed along as Aaron performed alongside of  powerhouse lineup that included Eric Roberson, She Is Phoenix, Astronauts Really Fly and Kontraband 215 for the hit music showcase Aaron Camper & Friends.  Check out our recap here.  This Maryland native and adopted Philadelphian has deep Philly ties and continues to remain connected to the Philly music scene — even if he just drops in town for a few weeks between tour dates. Aaron recently collaborated with West Philly emcee Chill Moody for their song “So in Love” and is currently cooking up some goodness with music producers Dilemma and JoeLogic. We’re pretty sure that there will be some new music coming from the Aaron’s camp very soon.  A genuine spirit and incredibly talented artists, it’s time everyone in Philly, and beyond, gets to know Aaron Camper. Take a look at our exclusive video below. Watch Philly 360°’s exclusive with singer/songwriter Aaron Camper.center_img Aaron Camper & Friends Takeover The Stage(D. McDowell for Philly 360°/ Visit Philly)last_img read more

Columbia officials testify in favor of city, school bus deal

first_img(Missourinet) Some Missouri cities have buses with plenty of open seats. Some school districts need a cheap way to get older students to class.State Rep. Chuck Basye is pushing a bill allowing school districts to contract with cities to transport high schoolers. The Columbia City Council and Columbia Public Schools Board of Education have endorsed the idea.“For students who don’t have cars to be able to access those services, this is going to be a really good benefit to them,” Councilman Michael Trapp said while testifying at the Capitol in Jefferson City on Tuesday.“We already can share funds, but for some reason we can’t share funds when it comes to busing,” CPS board member Jonathan Sessions said during his testimony.Opponents say they worry city buses don’t have the same safety measures as school buses.last_img read more

State lawmaker proposes seclusion and restraint legislation

first_imgA state lawmaker wants more limits on when kids can be put in an isolation room or restrained in Missouri schools.Republican Dottie Bailey says seclusion and restraint can lead to trauma for vulnerable students.Illinois’ governor issued an emergency rule banning seclusion rooms, after a Pro Publica report last month showed the way some schools in that state were using them.Monday was the first day Missouri lawmakers could pre-file bills for the 2020 state legislative session.last_img

Use Cases for Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager

first_imgAs you can see – using Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager technology, you can view your system’s power utilization in real-time using Intel Datacenter Manager and the administrator can implement the power caps to ensure your server rack stays within your required power limits.  By utilizing the ‘actual’ power limits instead of nameplate power, you can increase your rack density thereby increasing your ROI, and decrease your TCO!  Lets face it – everyone loves saving money!Many of us are familiar with this next scenario… it’s summertime, and the power company is announcing that the power grid is under strain.  Personal homes start having their A/C cut-off to save the power grid from brown-outs…  now your enterprise can help reduce those risks as well! Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager is a new technology that is available with the Xeon 5500 Series Platforms released earlier this year.  Many of you have asked me questions via Twitter (@Toadster) about “How can I use Node Manager?” – so I wanted to present some simple use cases to simplify the explanation of Node Manager and how you can best use the technology in your own enterprise.First of all, let’s explain the growth problem at hand.  As servers shrink in size, the density of each server ‘footprint’ is growing from a power perspective… a few years ago, a single 42U rack could hold about 21 servers (estimating 2U servers) – and usually hosting one or two apps/servers per physical server, depending on if you had single or dual-socket servers.  In modern datacenters, that same 42U rack can hold 42 servers (1U each) with 2P per server – so you have an immediate density increase of 2X the # of servers, and 2-4X the number of sockets – which can equate to 16X the number  processor threads per rack…  one good thing is that Intel has been developing newer technologies to keep the TDP of each CPU roughly the same over the same time period between processor updates… where you used to have 2 or 4 cores, you now have 8 to 16 cores at the same thermal envelope!Knowing how much power your platform uses is a key factor in populating racks and rows in your datacenter.  Prior to Node Manager technology, most Datacenter Managers would base rack population on ‘nameplate’ power – or the (W) rating on your power supply.  That’s the ‘max’ power utilized by the platform, and what the PSU is rated for (worst case).  See the image below… Over the next few weeks, I hope to post more blogs/videos:1. Single Node Power Monitoring & Management2. Group/Rack Power Monitoring & Management3. Thermal Monitoring & ManagementPlease provide some feedback, and post your questions and ideas for upcoming blogs!last_img read more

IDF2010: Memory error handling in SAP* in-memory database on Intel® Xeon® 7500 processor series

first_imgModern servers can now support up to terabytes of main memory and a failure of even a single memory cell can lead to a crash. Besides soft errors that can be corrected in hardware, hard uncorrectable errors can occur; in such case the only option for a server was to stop operation. In view of this recent report memory errors might cause downtimes and recovery, which is unacceptable for mission-critical enterprise systems. To address this issue Intel has introduced a wide range of reliability and high-availability features in the Intel® Xeon® 7500 processor series (code-named Nehalem-EX).These features are supported in Linux as Andi Kleen explains in his presentation: It is now possible that hard memory failures are caught by the operating system and exposed to applications. This way a server application can handle memory errors and continue to operate if running on Intel® Xeon® 7500 processor series.SAP has announced at Sapphire that they are working towards revolutionizing their enterprise software by taking advantage of their in-memory technology, which will allow fast queries and real-time processing. Instead of waiting hours to compile reports or days to replicate data in business warehouses, business users will get immediate responses on real-time data. Naturally, for in-memory processing, it is very important to be resistant against memory errors. Please check out our SSG booth at Intel Developer Forum 2010 in person and my colleague Otto Bruggeman will be happy to show you how SAP’s in-memory database is handling memory errors on Intel® Xeon® 7500 processor series.Best regards,Romanlast_img read more

The Big Intel Xeon Just Got Bigger

first_imgAll this brings me to the point of explaining the taxonomy here.A 4 socket machine has 4 NUMA nodesEach Socket has one chip or processorEach chip or processor has 10 physical coresEach Core has two threads for 20 threads per socketThe operating system sees each thread as a core. The Xeon E7 was released on April 5th – Now the SGI server here in our lab can now support 320 threads on 160 cores to process data along with its 512GB of RAM (expandable to 4TB with the existing configuration!).  And this beast can be expanded to 5120 threads on 256 cores.What a long strange trip it’s been.  30 years ago I stood in a semicircular crowd around a foldup table where a new IBM PC sat.  It had 64KB of RAM, a tape port (for storing data on a cassette tape), and a 5 ¼ inch floppy drive (no 8 inch floppies for this baby). This IBM PC sported an Intel 8088 processor, (8 bit bus for the 16 bit 8086 processor), and it was amazing.   I was working for FORTH, Inc then and I was impressed.  The Intel Architecture has moved so far from those days of the Intel 8086. But enough of the past; the present holds great potential and a lot of water has gone under the bridge.  The Xeon E7 brings AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) encryption and decryption right into the core where this security capability can run with nearly no apparent latency for the application.  The recent theft of the email addresses from Epsilon demonstrates the dangers in storing data in plain character format. Many enterprises have shied away from database encryption due to the inherent latency in decrypt and encrypt process.  This process is handled either through software or an accelerator card on the PCI bus.   This builds in latency that can have an effect on the application meeting SLA response time requirements.However, with encrypted data in a database the only time the data is exposed in human readable format is when it is being placed into the client systems and then it is limited to the immediate data at hand instead of the entire data set being exposed.  This is a significant security enhancement for mission critical applications.  Now, with the Xeon Processor E7 family this trade-off between living with significant latency for security or living with no encryption at all is gone.  Corporate Security Officers and developers don’t have to go through those ‘cost – benefit’ breakdowns any longer.Another big gain for System Administrators and Corporate Security Officers is the inclusion of Trusted Execution Technology (TXT) into the processor.   This TXT process ensures that an application or virtual machine is spawned in only a ‘known good’ environment.  Like current anti-virus ware that looks for ‘known bad’ signatures in the software, a process that can be charitably described as leap-frog between the virus writers and security vendors, the TXT in the core looks for a ‘known good’ signature in the new platform by comparing the configuration of the new hosting platform to a signature of the corporation’s standard platform.And now, with the 32 nanometer process, Intel has been able to squeeze 10 cores on to one processor along with accelerated I/O features and other enhancements.   Each core is dual threaded so the operating system sees 20 cores.  Look at Task Manager in Windows or /proc/cpuinfo in Linux.  With one 4 socket machine you’ll see 80 cores. Whew – Each of these threads blows away the Xeon cores of the past in speed, reliability, and security.A rough heuristicThat IBM PC I brought up at the beginning of this blog is now 30 years old.  At first it was viewed as a hobbyists toy like the TRS-80 from Radio Shack.  But businesses found the IBM PC expandable and Intel, following Moore’s Law, began the march to ever smaller and more powerful processors giving the consumer and business user more bang for their buck.   The old 8086 architecture is barely recognizable in these modern processors.Now the SGI machine in the lab here will have hit the world record performance in SPECint_rate_base2006 of 27,900 (as soon as we finish swapping out the Xeon 7500’s and installing the E7s – yes they are socket compatible with a BIOS update).last_img read more

Intel vPro: Finding Intel AMT Capable Platforms

first_imgEver wonder what platforms were in your environment?  Want to find out what machines are AMT Capable, AMT Configured and Provisioned, AMT Configured and Not Provisioned, and Non-AMT Platforms.  Now you can find and categorize the machines in your environment by using SCS System Discovery Tool.  This use case will explain how to use the system discovery standalone tool.  This tool gathers all the information from the ME (Management Engine) and the BIOS and stores that information into a registry key.  Edit the MOF files in SCCM to read this custom data, then create custom collections to categorize them.  For more information check out the use case link:last_img

A Look to the Future of IT

first_imgManaging the Changing IT Landscape: Future of IT We know that IT is changing, but do we know by how much? CIO Insight recently looked ahead to 2020 with data collected from A.T. Kearney from more than 150 CIOs. Not surprisingly, there are huge changes on the horizon.According to the research, “85 percent of CIOs are seeing IT requirements increase significantly, with more support needed for apps that enable multiple channels, including mobile.” Here are just a few key insights from the research findings that could affect IT projects and spending in future years:Data analytics will become a top priority.More than two-thirds of companies plan to invest in customer relations tools.Companies will need to balance advanced solutions with standardized packages.Nearly 75 percent of respondents indicated that time-to-market is a key performance indicator.Accelerating the paceWhen I moderated the Intel IT Center Webinar on mobility, the need to customize, simplify, and standardize became clear as objectives to accelerate the pace of innovation. In the midst of these challenges, the Intel IT team articulated a responsibility and a new approach to enable both personal productivity (solution choice) and business productivity (enterprise standards) across an expanding set of devices and operating systems.Cloud is keyAnd to enable this flexibility, cloud computing investments are equally important—cloud technologies are evolving as fast as devices are. By 2015, Intel expects more than 3 billion connected users and 15 billion connected devices  will be driving more than 1,500 exabytes of cloud traffic. To succeed in this new future of IT, CIOs must move quickly to adopt flexible cloud solutions and SaaS-based models for even greater standardization and customization.The success of any organization going forward will depend on the use of innovative technologies to meet business needs in less time. And from my perspective, meeting business needs starts with true collaboration. It’s even listed as the first of five qualities of an effective CIO in a recent blog from CIO Insight.Do you agree that collaboration is key to business success? What planning tips do you have for preparing for the future of IT?Chris Peters @chris_p_intel #ITCenter #FutureofITlast_img read more

How Can a Software-First Strategy Improve Your Data Center?

first_imgSoftware-first networking can be an interesting theory or a transformative technology for enterprise computing. Which one it is depends on your perspective…and maybe your age.Many of today’s enterprise IT leaders will remember the glory days of infrastructure expansion. If you needed more CPU or storage, it was easy and relatively inexpensive to throw new hardware at the problem of scale and capacity.While that approach was not sustainable, it helped to establish a habitual response to IT challenges: more hardware. For a while it seemed that any computing, storage, or networking problem could be solved by more or better boxes.But the modern IT landscape has blown that assumption out of the water. Data volumes and encryption demands are orders of magnitude larger than they were a mere two decades ago. Computing power has increased exponentially and predictably such that dual-socket servers with 44 cores (88 threads) are now readily available.  Eye-popping volumes of corporate data and off-the-charts processing power can be a powerful combination…if your network can move data efficiently enough.Enter the software-first approach. It is a strategy that removes barriers that arise when IT services are bound to physical devices. While you can’t entirely ignore hardware, the right components can prepare you for the future of software-defined everything. Intel and Citrix are working together to help you make a successful transition from a hardware-centric network into a software-defined network (SDN).Hardware Versus SoftwareA hardware-defined network has inherent limitations associated with physical devices. These limitations constrict data flow and make  it harder to scale, upgrade, or otherwise transform your data center.A software-first strategy shifts your company’s infrastructure from being overly reliant on hardware. The strategy looks to software solutions, rather than more hardware, to give your data center the agility and throughput that it needs to process today’s gigantic volumes of structured and unstructured data—even when that data is encrypted.One way to begin the software-first journey is to incorporate automation into the network by way of application delivery controllers (ADCs).You might be thinking, “But, Tim, you just told me that moving toward a software-first strategy is the way to go. An ADC is a piece of hardware.” You’re right—at least partially. You can’t replace your hardware-centric data center with a software-centric one over night, but you can take small steps toward your software-defined infrastructure (SDI) goal.Your First StepsIf you want to move toward an SDN, you’re going to want Citrix NetScaler. NetScaler is an ADC that can be deployed as a physical, virtual, physical-virtual hybrid, or containerized appliance. Because each iteration of NetScaler shares a single API and set of code, it’s much easier to transition from a physical NetScaler ADC to a virtual ADC than it would be to install or upgrade hardware. The shared code base and API also mean that NetScaler integrates with your heterogeneous environment regardless of hypervisor, cloud, orchestration platform, or fabric architecture.For example, you could deploy Citrix NetScaler MPX today—that’s the bare-metal version—to optimize network traffic. Then when you’re ready to start walking the software-defined road, you can switch to Citrix NetScaler SDX, which is a physical appliance that supports multiple virtual instances of NetScaler software. Then, once you’re ready to move your network control into the virtual space, you can upgrade to Citrix NetScaler VPX, a virtual appliance.If you’re a cloud-based provider or app developer, the micro-version of NetScaler VPX, known as NetScaler CPXOpens in a new window, might be your best bet.Software-first SupportRunning NetScaler on the Intel Xeon processor E5 family can propel you into the software-first arena. NetScaler was designed to capitalize on technology built into the Intel Xeon processor E5 v4 family allowing NetScaler to bypass main memory and route data through to the L3 cache, which can reach sizes up to 55 MB. That puts data even closer to the processor.The Intel Xeon processor E5 family is available in a variety of configurations, so you can choose the processor that best fits your data center’s needs. The Intel Xeon processor E5 v4 family supports up to 1.5 TB of fast memory (DDR3/DDR4). Other Intel technologies baked into the processor enhance security and accelerate encryption.Read MoreThere’s a lot more to the symbiosis between the Intel Xeon processor E5 family and Citrix NetScaler than this blog can cover. Read our latest paper, Citrix and Intel Help Advance Next-Generation Data Centers with NetScaler,Opens in a new window to get the full picture.To stay up to date on the latest big data news and developments, check out the #TechTim community on Twitter, and follow me @TimIntel.last_img read more

DevOps is more than tools and automation

first_imgTechnical people tend to look towards technology to solve most problems. We all assume that if it can be done manually, then we can probably find some “bot” use for automation. Since that step involves tools, let’s just jump in and pick one to use — all right? DevOps dictates that you focus differently from the start. We must change the way we think, interact and ultimately work, in order to truly embrace the value that Agile and DevOps can deliver.Corporate ValuesMost evangelists for Agile and DevOps practices start by transforming the values that people and the team works with. Call it a cultural shift or a paradigm change. It is paramount that everyone is working off some base values so that there is little impeding the transformation that DevOps promises.Inside Intel we have a robust culture focused on the valuesOpens in a new window of quality, risk-taking, great place to work, discipline, customer orientation and results orientation. This culture has changed very little over the years, and I remember when I started over 21 years ago, we did a whole “Back to Basics” kick off. This campaign was aimed at ensuring that our rapidly growing company continued to embrace the core values that helped make Intel great.We are Embracing Agile & DevOpsOur successes moving forward is tied to being consistent while delivering the products of the highest quality. This means we are driving out technical debt to ensure that our solutions maintain relevance, all while delivering value to the customer in everything we do. Some of the items we have began embracing include:Focusing on outcomes instead of outputs.Deliver high quality solutions. We need ensure we are testing the right things while reducing the need to do testing manually.Increasing our own confidence in our quality measures, so we can constantly innovate and experiment.Learning that it is alright to fail. Just do it fast and recover faster, so that work can continue. Learn from every failure.Be aware of the fragility that exists and put in place concrete plans to reduce that technical debt.Be respectful, open, honest, direct and always focused on improving the team and your relationships with your mates.Shift towards full product accountability instead of delivering only your tasks defined inside the project.This is merely a subset of the challenges we have set for ourselves. Transforming the way that a company works, especially one that is nearly 50 years old, will take time. We are focused on improving the value we can return to our customers by embracing our core cultural values and applying them to all the products we create, deliver and support.How is your journey going? Have you made the decision to jump all-in for Agile and DevOps?I’m curious to hear of successes, failure and how we can help to provide visibility in our own multi-year journey.last_img read more

Talking Super Saturday With RetailROI’s Greg Buzek

first_imgBack in September 2008, a group of retail leaders were chatting at Oracle OpenWorld when the conversation turned toward charity. “A group of us got together and said, ‘We’re competing with each other for everything, but let’s do something together,’” Greg Buzek, the founder and president of IHL Group and one of Retail Orphan Initiative’s trustees, recalls. “‘We can work with orphans and vulnerable kids.’”The seed of a big idea was planted. A year later at NRF’s Big Show, the group met again to figure out how to raise money to start making a difference. They realized they were well-versed in events, with connections to great speakers and people with access to sponsor budgets. So the group determined an event with all proceeds going to building computer labs, clean water projects, and other charitable efforts to help vulnerable kids could be a huge success. The next year, in 2010, the seed bloomed and Super Saturday was born.“We are a grassroots charity of people in the retail industry that has three goals,” Buzek explains. “One is to bring awareness that there are over 400 million children that are orphaned or in vulnerable conditions around the world. Two, to bring our networks and abilities to bear to help. And three, to partner with charities that are doing great work very efficiently, to come alongside them to deliver financial donations and experience in the areas of clean water, schools and education, computer training and labs. And we also do some general care and feeding programs depending on the situation.”The Super Saturday EventThis year’s Super Saturday event, scheduled for January 14, is set to be the best yet. Taking place at Manhattan’s Harvard Club, Super Saturday will feature nearly 20 speakers across a full day of programming and 285 attendees, many of whom are C-level executives from major retailers and charities. Featuring numerous TED Talk-style seminars on the latest retail technology and trends, plus discussions of shopper evolution, every other session is about RetailROI’s charity work. Super Saturday also features multiple opportunities to network with fellow retail industry do-gooders. “It’s a very, very fast-paced day where people come together and we raise about half a million dollars to go toward building schools and more,” Buzek says. Ninety-four percent of money that comes in during Super Saturday goes out in project grants.A new facet of this year’s event is a youth summit for the children of Super Saturday attendees. “We thought, this year, it’d be really great if we invested in our own kids,” Buzek explains. “We have this incredible executive talent [available at Super Saturday] to teach skills like networking, how important LinkedIn is, and how to do college applications and get scholarships.”Last year, one attendee’s daughter received three job offers after speaking on a few millennial panels. It’s an opportunity for the attendees’ children to spend time with their parents while networking, learning, and understanding the broader charitable goals of RetailROI.It’s All About the Kids“Since we started,” Buzek says. “We’ve been able to help about 185,000 kids in 19 countries around the world.”Numbers like that showcase the impressive larger impact of RetailROI, but the more personal impact can be shown in the stories of what that money went toward. For instance, with the help of Intel, one of RetailROI’s earliest partners, the organization built a school in Liberia — the first school in that area in 15 years.“We’ve done trips to about 10 countries around the world where our retail executives have worked side by side with the charities, and that has led to what I call RetailROI 2.0,” Buzek says. “People are now joining the boards of our partner charities and helping them from a business perspective.”“Most of us, we go to college and we come out and we want to change the world. Then, life takes over. We’ve got school loans to pay, we have kids, we have soccer practice, and we get to our 40s and wonder ‘What I do every day — does it make a difference?’ And the answer is yes, if you’re willing to get past what you can’t do.”By understanding the work people are doing, and what their needs are, RetailROI learns how best to offer their resources. The perfect example comes in a story that begins with a computer lab in a school in Honduras. After the lab was built, RetailROI continued to help the school, where the needs of the kitchen quickly became obvious. A CIO from Schlotzsky’s involved with RetailROI knew that his head of franchising, John Geyerman, could add some efficiency to the kitchen. He saw the corn shucking process there — done by hand by 13-year-old girls who were handmaking 4,300 tortillas daily — and assessed the issues. Collaborating with his buyers, suppliers, and contacts, Geyerman was able to put together a million dollar kitchen for this school for only $65,000, due in large part to their volunteered skills and abilities.But it didn’t stop there. Geyerman thought it’d be beneficial to help the girls working in the kitchen learn a trade. So working with RetailROI, they translated a food safety course into Spanish so the children could all earn food safety certificates. Catering classes were also developed to help the students become better candidates for jobs. That’s how RetailROi is making a difference. Caring concerned people are using daily job skills, but they’re turning these skills to nonprofit organizations and efforts.“When you can start matching executives — people that think in a five-year clip — with [partner charities], it becomes a powerful combination,” Buzek says.It’s a powerful combination that Intel is very proud to be a part of as one of RetailROI’s partners and as a sponsor of Super Saturday. You can follow RetailROI’s efforts via their Twitter for updates on Super Saturday and opportunities to get involved in their charitable work in 2017.last_img read more

Who’s Winning the Global Battle for AI Leadership?

first_imgWashington Executive Magazine just released their most recent list of Top 10 Execs to Watch, and I’m finding it illuminating to see what categories they’re choosing to highlight, such as security, cyber and, most recently Artificial Intelligence (AI), and data science. I was honored to learn that I was being included with such a distinguished group of executives who are using AI to drive change and transform the country.It’s equally interesting that data science and AI are focal points of the latest Top 10 list because I believe we’re in the midst of a global race for supremacy right now, and it’s not an arms race or a space race, it’s a race for AI leadership.And the U.S. needs to move fast, and decisively, if we’re going to come out on top.What’s at stake?PWC says AI could contribute $15.7 trillion to the global economy by 2030.Accenture projects the AI healthcare market will hit $6.6 billion by 2021 (a compounded annual growth rate of 40%).IDC predicts global spending on AI will reach $57.6 billion by 2021.And there’s untapped potential: only 15% of enterprises are using AI today but 31% say it’s on their agenda, according to Adobe.Data analytics, machine learning, cognitive computing, and artificial intelligence give businesses and government the opportunity to boost operational efficiency and launch new delivery models. Imagine more efficient methods of screening for fraud, accelerating response times for first responders to emergencies or natural disasters, or reallocating routine tasks to machines so public servants have the time to tackle more complex cases for citizens. Imagine a day when lining up to renew a driver’s license at the DMV or apply for government services is a thing of the past.Making AI a National PriorityOn July 31st, the government announced the 2020 Administration Research and Development Budget Priorities, which include:Security of the American People—Calling on investment in emerging technologies including AI, cyber and autonomous systems.American Leadership in AI, Quantum Information Systems and Strategic Computing—To deliver on the promise of scientific breakthroughs that can transform the American way of life.American Connectivity and Autonomy including 5G networks.Manufacturing—Next-generation manufacturing enabled by machine learning, AI and the Internet of Things.Space Exploration—And the opportunity to use machine learning capabilities for applications in space and on earth.Medical Innovation—Where AI and machine learning have the potential to positively impact treatment.Agriculture—Where sensors, data analytics and machine learning can reduce inputs and improve crop yields.Of the eight areas prioritized for investment, seven leverage AI to advance or accelerate breakthroughs. That’s how important AI is becoming to our country (and the world).Accelerating AI AdoptionI talk a great deal about the need to accelerate AI adoption and with good reason: If we don’t get to the benefit of AI quickly, we may not get to the benefits at all.Realizing the benefits of AI and data science is highly dependent on our ability to do some very difficult things very quickly. One of those difficult things is finding talented, skilled people who want to work in government. With millions of open jobs in data science in the U.S., finding those skilled people is a tall order and will impact our ability to deliver on the AI promise.The next challenge revolves around the data itself. We have, and are generating, unprecedented amounts of data, but to make it meaningful, we must be able to label and classify it so that we can access and utilize the right data at the right time for the right reasons. Addressing this challenge overlaps with the skills shortage: We are going to need a workforce trained, available and willing to do the work of analytics. More data can’t equate to more work!Building a Solid AI FoundationAs a data scientist, I know the potential (and pitfalls) of AI adoption. The right ecosystem of hardware, software, and accelerators from the cloud to the edge will facilitate innovation in AI deployments and get us to the benefits we are seeking faster.In tandem, we must address a wide range of challenges from skills shortages and training to data management and the ethical questions that are inextricably linked to AI, so we can avoid some of the unintended consequences associated with outsourcing human cognition to intelligent systems.We need to start working together as a cohesive, yet flexible group of academia, industry, and the government to put the pieces of this puzzle together so we can win with AI.last_img read more

Will Hayabusa’s Success Lead to a Space Encore?

first_imgTOKYO—The heart-warming story of the Hayabusa spacecraft, which overcame failed engines, degraded solar panels, fuel leaks, and faulty communications to touch down on asteroid Itokawa and return to Earth, has captured the imagination of the Japanese public. And it could bode well for a follow-up mission. The spacecraft’s fiery demise in the skies above Australia last week has triggered blanket TV and newspaper coverage of the capsule’s return to the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) labs near Tokyo, where the payload will be analyzed for the presence of asteroid dust. Feature stories have explained how the composition of asteroids may provide clues to conditions in the early universe. Business page articles have highlighted the role of Japanese companies that built Hayabusa’s engines, sensors, and instruments. And the JAXA visitor center in downtown Tokyo, featuring a model of Itokawa, is enjoying double its usual daily traffic. Hayabusa’s most important fan, however, just might be Naoto Kan, the country’s new prime minister. Kan praised the mission in comments to the Japanese legislature last week and voiced support for a second asteroid mission. But it’s not clear whether such high-level backing will translate into more funding. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) A request for $19 million this year by JAXA’s Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) to begin planning Hayabusa 2 to launch in 2015 or 2016 was slashed to just $300,000. So Kan’s kind words are welcome, says ISAS’s Yasunori Matogawa. “But where will the money come from?” The budget for space science has been flat for years, he says, and shifting money from other space projects would “cause a lot of trouble.” Kan’s government has also pledged to reduce overall government spending. The chances of a second mission might improve after researchers conclude whether the retrieved canister contains samples, which would be the first ever returned from an asteroid. The announcement, expected within the next couple of weeks, could influence decisions on the government’s budget, now being drafted, for the fiscal year beginning next April.last_img read more

Occupy London’s School of Hard Knocks

first_imgClassroom. Manuel Castells spoke to Occupy LSX this morning. @bitfuzzy PATERNOSTER SQUARE, LONDON—In the shadow of St. Paul’s Cathedral, across from a Starbucks papered in protest signs, London’s newest “university” is gaining popularity. At Tent City University, members of Occupy the London Stock Exchange (Occupy LSX) can hear academics—including a few big names—speak about a variety of topics related to their movement. Tent City University held its first lectures, many of them in an actual tent, near the end of October, soon after protesters moved in to Paternoster Square and St. Paul’s. It was an effort to provide “a free university, which is rarefied in the world of education,” says Katherine Stanley, one of Occupy LSX’s spokespeople. After sending out some initial invites, Stanley says they’ve recently been “inundated with e-mails” from interested speakers. The lineup of talks—written on a whiteboard outside Occupy LSX’s neatly arranged library, “Starbooks”—is a mixed bag, with subjects as varied as the history of St. Paul’s, economic theory, homeopathy, and the dangers of nuclear power. But a few names stand out. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Today, for instance, celebrated Spanish sociologist and Berkeley professor Manuel Castells stopped by at the square to talk about how networking and organization shape society. (Castells gave a lecture series at the University of Cambridge the past week.) “What we have at the moment is democracy, but a restrained form of democracy – and the political class has an interest in maintaining the rules of the game,” Castells told the crowd, according to Occupy London’s Twitter feed. Sociologists from the University of London and the University of Roehampton and representatives from several nongovernmental organizations on climate change are booked later this month. Speaking later today is anthropologist Jerome Lewis of University College London, who got involved after some of his students asked him. Lewis sat in on several other talks recently and says people are enthusiastic and ask good questions. “It provides access to a large number of people who wouldn’t otherwise speak to an academic,” he says, as well as good dialogue in a cozy tent space. Lewis, who studies pygmy hunter-gatherer societies in Africa, will discuss how humans evolved to live in these kinds of societies, whose richest members share their excess without a second thought. “It’s an ancient human tradition,” he says—and he hopes the Occupy movement will incorporate that bit of social science into its message.last_img read more

A New Record for Retractions? (Part 2)

first_imgAn investigating committee in Japan has concluded that a Japanese anesthesiologist, Yoshitaka Fujii, fabricated a whopping 172 papers over the past 19 years. Among other problems, the panel, set up by the Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists, could find no records of patients and no evidence medication was ever administered. “It is as if someone sat at a desk and wrote a novel about a research idea,” the committee wrote in a 29 June summary report posted in Japanese on the society’s Web site. The fabrications could produce a record number of retractions by a single author if the journals, as seems likely, decide to retract the papers. ScienceInsider was unable to reach Fujii, who had asked the society not to provide the media with his contact information. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Fujii’s findings have been under a cloud since 8 March when an analysis in the journal Anaesthesia raised questions about his data. On 9 April, 23 journal editors publicly asked seven Japanese institutions named in the papers to investigate. The anesthesiology society took on the task because “it would have been difficult for any one institution to clarify what happened,” says Koji Sumikawa, an anesthesiologist at Nagasaki University who headed the investigation. The panel focused on 212 of 249 known Fujii papers. It tried to review the raw data, laboratory notebooks, and records on the patients or animal subjects involved. Committee members also interviewed relevant people. Among the 172 papers judged bogus, the report claims that 126 studies of randomized, double-blind, controlled trials “were totally fabricated.” The committee identified only three valid papers. For another 37 papers, the panel could not conclusively determine if there had been fabrication. The report states that Fujii started falsifying data in 1993 and found a pattern of fabrication that stretched through his successive stints at Tokyo Medical and Dental University, the University of Tsukuba, and Toho University in Tokyo. Toho dismissed Fujii last February when an internal investigation found he never got ethical review board approval for several studies. Sumikawa says the panel concluded that Fujii tried to hide what he was doing, even from his co-authors. He deliberately blurred the timing of the studies and where they were conducted, the report states, by naming hospitals and institutions where he worked part-time or had some affiliation. The panel said that the responsibility of those co-authors ranges from “serious” to “none at all.” The only one of Fujii’s co-authors specifically named in the summary is University of Tsukuba anesthesiologist Hidenori Toyooka. The report says Toyooka “was not involved in fabrication but bears significant responsibility” since he was Fujii’s supervising professor both at Tsukuba and when they both worked at Tokyo Medical and Dental University. Toyooka is listed as a co-author of many of the papers cited by the 23 journal editors. (Toyooka could not be reached for comment.) At the same time, the investigation found that some scientists were unaware Fujii had included them as co-authors. In one case, two supposed co-authors told the panel their signatures on a submission cover letter were forged. A post from 18 June on the blog Retraction Watch suggests why the researchers didn’t realize their names were on Fujii’s papers: The papers didn’t attract much attention. The blog notes that three recently retracted papers only garnered six, four, and three citations. Despite the low impact of the work, Fujii apparently used his high productivity to land new jobs, obtain public research funding, and garner fees for speaking at industry seminars, according to the panel’s summary report. He even applied for prizes offered by the society, although he was never chosen. Sumikawa says the summary is being sent to the 23 editors as well as to the institutions involved. Formally, it is the responsibility of those institutions to request retractions. Responding to a query from ScienceInsider, the University of Tsukuba’s public relations department issued a written statement indicating the school is taking the society’s findings seriously and will consider them in its own ongoing investigation. German anesthesiologist Joachim Boldt is believed to hold the dubious distinction of having the most retractions—about 90. Boldt’s scientific record also came under fire several years ago by some of the same journal editors questioning Fujii’s work. Sumikawa says Fujii recently contacted the society claiming that parts of his work were valid, “but he didn’t identify which parts.” Sumikawa says the society plans shortly to post a detailed report in Japanese, followed by an English translation. The committee recommended several measures aimed at reducing the incidence of misconduct. They include regular seminars to raise awareness of the ethical aspects of medical research and to clarify the responsibilities of lead authors and co-authors. The report also said scientific societies, along with journals and institutions, should be prepared to investigate when questions are raised about publications by their members. *This item originally stated that a 29 June post on the blog Retraction Watch suggests that Fujii’s fake co-authors didn’t realize their names were on papers because the papers didn’t attract much attention. That post was from 18 June and the 29 June post discussed the number of papers in which Fujii is said to have faked data.last_img read more